Guide: How to load games onto the RG350 (Home Consoles and Handhelds)

Last updated 21SEP2020 (see Changelog for details)

One of the most fundamental aspects of owning an RG350 (or any emulation device, really) is to learn how to load your game files onto it. In this guide I will walk you through how to install all of the major home console and handheld device emulators, load their game files, plus highlight any unique configurations that are needed to make sure your games are running perfectly. While you’re here, be sure to check out my other comprehensive guides:

My comprehensive RG350 install guides:

Table of Contents

Before we get started
Is it illegal to download ROMs?
Set up your file structure
A primer on microSD cards
Prepare the external microSD card

Home Consoles:
Atari 2600
Atari 5200
Atari 800
Atari 7800
ColecoVision
Vectrex
Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)
Nintendo Famicom Disk System
Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES)
Nintendo 64
Sega SG1000
Sega Master System
Sega Genesis (Mega Drive)
Sega CD (Mega CD)
Sega 32x (Mega Drive 32x)
Sony Playstation
TurboGrafx-16
TurboGrafx-CD
Panasonic 3DO

Handheld Consoles:
Nintendo Game & Watch
Nintendo Game Boy
Nintendo Game Boy Color
Nintendo Game Boy Advance
Nintendo DS
Sega Game Gear
Neo Geo Pocket & Neo Geo Color
Watara Supervision (QuickShot Supervision)
Atari Lynx
Wonderswan & Wonderswan Color

Changelog

Before we get started

You need two basic elements to play retro console and handheld games on the RG350.

First, you will need an emulator, which is a software program that emulates the console/handheld itself. Some emulators will only work on one specific platform, while others can support several platforms.

Next, emulators require game files, or ROMs, in order to run. ROMs are small “dumps” of game cartridge/disc data packaged in a way that the emulator understands. There are many ways to package ROMs, so below I will focus on the file types that are most compatible with the RG350.

In addition to ROMs, some emulators (particularly those that are disc-based) require BIOS (boot) files. Many emulators come pre-packaged with the BIOS already, while others require you to add them yourself (I will make note of it below).

Is it illegal to download ROMs?

Although the legality of downloading game files (ROMs) has not been tested in court, the general consensus is that it is copyright infringement to download games that you do not already own. That being said, there is a legally defensible argument that if you already own a game, downloading a backup copy is acceptable under the Fair Use policy of copyright law. I have written a comprehensive guide about the subject, which you can read here. As a rule of thumb, no game or BIOS (boot file) links are available on this website. Emulators, however, are open-source software files that are most definitely legal; therefore, you’ll find links to all of the necessary emulators below.

File structure on my PC, which is replicated on my external microSD card

Set up your file structure

Before we get the game files on your device, let’s talk about how you should organize them on your computer. You’ll want to create a location on your computer to store and organize all of your game files. In the picture above you can see that I’ve created a folder called “Retro Games”, and then a folder for each of the game systems. Within each of these system folders go my game files. I would name them something short and logical, probably no more than 3-4 words in length.

Once you have these folders set up and organized, you’ll be able to drag some (or all) of them directly to the microSD card you’ll use in your device. So let’s talk about microSD cards.

A primer on microSD cards

The RG350 makes use of two microSD cards at the same time. The “internal” card, also known as the firmware card or TF1 card, is located inside the device on the original RG350, and on the leftmost SD card slot on the bottom of the RG350M and RG3350P. The internal card stores your emulators and other software necessary to run the RG350. The RG350 ships with the internal card already installed and configured, usually on a 16GB card. In general, this is enough space for your application files, although I do recommend you back up this internal card in case something happens to the software (or the card itself, which is a bit cheaper than the SD cards you can buy at a store). To learn how to access this internal SD card without having to remove the card itself, check out this guide.

The “external” card, also known as the data card or TF2 card, is located on the bottom of all RG350 models (on the original RG350 it’s the only SD card slot on the bottom, and on the RG350M and RG350P it’s the rightmost SD card slot on the bottom. The external card stores your game files. There are some exceptions to this general rule; for example, you can actually put the emulators on your external card and they’ll still run, and you can play game files off the internal SD card. But for the sake of simplicity, let’s focus on: internal card = emulators, and external card = game files. This card slot can hold up to 512GB cards, so buy the card that fits your library with some room to spare; in general, I think that a 128GB card will fit most people’s needs, and it’ll probably set you back less than $20.

Prepare the external microSD card

Before we dive into the guide, let’s talk about how to organize your external SD card to save you time and headaches in the long run. First and foremost, format the external microSD card into FAT32. On Windows, you will need to use a program called guiformat, and change the “Allocation Unit Size” to 65536 in the drop-down menu. For Mac, use Disk Utility to format (“erase”) the card, with MS-DOS (FAT) as the format.

Okay, now that you have a freshly-formatted microSD card, you can now start adding your game files. Open the card, and create a folder named “ROMS”. Simply drag all of your game folders into the card; kick back and watch all of your files populate the card. Once the files are on the card, you’ll use the emulators to navigate to their location on the card, and boot them up. Here’s a quick video of me booting a few games from the card so you can get a feel for it (ignore the audio issues, those are due to my HDMI capture card, not the device itself).

Okay, now that we’ve gone through the basics, let’s get to the meat and potatoes of this guide. Below you will find all of the major home and handheld consoles that are supported by the RG350, as well as a link to download their respective emulator, and a guide on how to install and customize the software.


Atari 2600

RG350 emulator: Stella 3.9.3 (source)
Recommended game file types: .zip, .a26

Setting up the Atari 2600 on your RG350 is fairly simple. Download and unzip the Stella emulator, then place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the games in a folder named ROMS/Atari 2600 in your external SD card. The controls are not very intuitive, since they are modeled after the old Atari joystick. Just remember that the A button is the big red button on the original joystick.

There is an updated version of the Stella emulator out there, Stella_2015-10-06, but I have not been able to get it working. The 3.9.3 version seems to work fine.

Controls:
D-Pad/Left Analog Stick: Joystick movement
A: Joystick fire
B: Select
Y: Command menu
X: Fire5
L1: Load Savestate
R1: Save Savestate
SELECT: Reset
START: Main menu

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Atari 5200

RG350 emulator: Atari800 (2020-03-20) (source)
Recommended game file types: .a52

Download and unzip the Atari800 emulator, then place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the games in a folder named ROMS/Atari 5200 in your external SD card.

When first booting up the emulator, you will want to adjust some of its settings. Press select to enter the menu, then go to “Display Settings”, then “Video mode settings”. Set “Fullscreen” to NO to stretch the screen to match the RG350. Press L1 to back out of this menu, then go to “Color preset” within the Display Settings, and adjust it to “Virbrant”. Press L1 to back out to the main menu, and go to “System Settings” and change the “RAM size” to 128 KB. Finally, press L1 to back out to the main menu, and go to “Emulator Configuration” and select “Save configuration file” to save your settings.

To start an Atari 5200 game, go to “Run Atari Program” in the main menu. Navigate to the media/RG350/ROMS/Atari 5200 (or however your external SD card is named), and select a game. It will ask you which cartridge type you want to load, typically it will be “Standard 8/16 KB 5200 cartridge” but you may have to experiment.

Controls:
START: START
SELECT: Atari800 menu 
L2: Pause
R2: Virtual Keyboard ON/OFF 
X: joystick UP
A: Fire
B: Second Fire
Y: *

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Atari 800

RG350 emulator: Atari800 (2020-03-20) (source)
Recommended game file types: .atr, .cas, .rom

Download and unzip the Atari800 emulator, then place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the games in a folder named ROMS/Atari 800 in your external SD card.

When first booting up the emulator, you will want to adjust some of its settings. Press select to enter the menu, then go to “Display Settings”, then “Video mode settings”. Set “Fullscreen” to NO to stretch the screen to match the RG350. Press L1 to back out of this menu, then go to “Color preset” within the Display Settings, and adjust it to “Virbrant”. Press L1 to back out to the main menu, and go to “System Settings” and change the “RAM size” to 128 KB. Finally, press L1 to back out to the main menu, and go to “Emulator Configuration” and select “Save configuration file” to save your settings.

To start an Atari 800 game, go to “Run Atari Program” in the main menu. Navigate to the media/RG350/ROMS/Atari 800 (or however your external SD card is named), and select a game. It should boot automatically. If you are playing a multi-disk game and it asks for disk 2, press SELECT to return to the Atari800 menu, then go to “Disk Management”, and load the second disk in the D1 slot; press L1 twice to return to the game, then proceed.

Controls:
SELECT: Atari800 menu 
START: START key
L1: SELECT
L2: OPTION
R1 = BACKSPACE
R3 = SPACEBAR 
Y = ENTER key
R2 = virtual keyboard
B = SHIFT key
X = joystick UP

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Atari 7800

RG350 emulator: ProSystem (2013-06-16) (source)
Recommended game file types: .a78

To set up the Atari 7800, download and unzip the ProSystem emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Atari 7800 folder of your external SD card.

Controls:
D-Pad: Joystick movement
A: Button 1
B: Button 2
X: Reset
Y: Reset
SELECT: Select
START: Pause
L1: Right difficulty button
R1: Left difficulty button
START + SELECT: Menu

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ColecoVision

RG350 emulator: SMSPlus_gcw0 (2019-11-29) (source)
Recommended game file types: .col

The ColecoVision requires a BIOS file in order to work. This BIOS file is often entitled “ColecoVision BIOS.col”; you will need to rename that file to “BIOS.col”.

To begin, place the SMSPlus emulator in the media/data/apps/ folder on your internal SD card. Place some games on your external microSD card, in a file structure similar to RG350/ROMS/ColecoVision. Make sure that the game files are unzipped, in .col format. Turn on your RG350, and then try and boot a game from the SMSPlus emulator. You will probably get a blank black screen, just press SELECT and “Quit”. Go back into your internal SD card, and now you should see a folder in /media/data/local/home/.smsplus/bios — place your “BIOS.col” file there. Now you should be able to boot up games no problem.

Note that many games will require you to press “1” or “2” on the keypad in order to start a game, and these buttons are not mapped by default on the emulator. You’ll want to press the SELECT button, then select “Input remapping”, and map the [1] and [2] buttons to something on the RG350 (I did the shoulder buttons).

Controls:
SELECT - bring up SMSPlus menu

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Vectrex

RG350 emulator: DinguxVectrex (2014-05-21) (source)
Recommended game file types: .vec

To set up the Vectrex, download and unzip the DinguxVectrex emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Vectrex folder of your external SD card.

Controls:
START + SELECT: Menu

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Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)

RG350 emulator: FCEUX (2019-11-15) (source)
Recommended game file types: .nes

To set up the NES, download and unzip the FCEUX emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/NES folder of your external SD card.

  • When playing FCEUX on an RG350M, you may need to press START + A to stretch to full screen.
  • This version of FCEUX linked above supports hardware scaling, while the version of FCEUX that shipped with your console likely does not. Hardware scaling will provide a crisper picture on the RG350 (and even better on the RG350M). For the clearest graphics, briefly hold POWER + Down on the D-Pad to remove any software-forced sharpening.
  • FCEUX supports a number of cheat systems. See my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more info.
  • There are two other NES emulators available for the RG350:
    • I have not been able to successfully run NEStopia, but I’ve added a link to it just in case you want to try it out (taken from this source).
    • Mednafen (source) runs a variety of platforms, including NES, Game Boy, Game Boy Advance, and Atari Lynx. I do not recommend it over FCEUX because it is not as user-friendly, and I couldn’t figure out how to configure fullscreen mode. To exit out of Mednafen, press SELECT + Y, and to configure the buttons, press SELECT + B. There is no on-screen configuration option, you must edit a configuration file found at /media/data/local/home/.mednafen/mednafen-09x.cfg (for more details, read this guide). In order to get the audio to work, you must change the following settings in the Mednafen config file:
;Select sound output device.
sound.device sexyal-literal-default

and

;Specifies the sound playback rate, in sound frames per second("Hz").
sound.rate 44100
Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER or L2: FCEUX menu
SELECT + R1: screenshot

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Nintendo Famicom Disk System (FDS)

RG350 emulator: FCEUX (source)
Recommended game file types: .zip

Like the NES, the Famicom Disk System is launched via the FCEUX emulator. To set up the Famicom Disk System, download and unzip the FCEUX emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card (if you’ve already done this for the NES, no need to do it again). Place the game files in the ROMS/FDS folder of your external SD card.

  • There is an updated version of FCEUX (dated 2019-11-15 and linked above in the NES section), but the “Flip Disc” function does not seem to work with some Famicom Disk System games. I recommend you use the older FCEUX version listed in this section for FDS games that require you to flip a the disc, and the updated FCEUX for NES games.
  • When playing FCEUX on an RG350M, you may need to press START + A to stretch to full screen.
  • In order to get the Famicom Disk System to run, it requires a BIOS (boot) file. You will need to acquire this on your own, and it needs to be named “disksys.rom” (all lowercase). Place the disksys.rom file in the media/data/local/home/.fceux folder on your internal SD card.
  • The game files must be zipped in order to boot — plain .fds files won’t work. Use an app like WinRAR (PC) or YemuZip (Mac) to zip the game files before loading onto your external SD card.
  • Some games will require you to use the “Flip Disc” feature in FCEUX. See the short video below for an example with the game Doki Doki Panic!
Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER or L2: FCEUX menu
SELECT + R1: screenshot

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Super Nintendo Entertainment System (SNES)

RG350 emulator: PocketSNES (2019-12-12) (source)
Recommended game file types: .smc

To set up the SNES, download and unzip the PocketSNES emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/SNES folder of your external SD card.

  • PocketSNES doesn’t support cheats, but you can always patch cheats directly into your SNES ROM files. See my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more information.
  • There is a test version of SNES9x also available, which was compiled on 2019-11-11. This emulator supposedly has a wider compatibility than PocketSNES, but can run a little more slowly. So if you have a game that won’t run on PocketSNES, give this emulator a try.
Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER button: PocketSNES menu

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Nintendo 64

RG350 emulator: Mupen64plus (source)
Recommended game file types: .n64

Yes, it is possible to load Nintendo 64 games on the RG350 devices. They play very slowly, but some simpler games are still playable. The emulator I have linked above has all of the buttons mapped for the RG350.

If you want to look at any of your other configuration opportunities, or to adjust the buttons, go to the /media/data/local/home/.config/mupen64plus/mupen64plus.cfg file, open it in a text editor, and make the adjustments there.

To set up the N64, download and unzip the Mupen64plus emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/N64 folder of your external SD card.

Here’s a video I made running through 16 different N64 games so you can see what the gameplay looks like. To be honest, of the 16 I tested, four or five of them are definitely playable and are staying on my RG350 permanently.

Controls/Hotkeys:
R2: "Z" button
SELECT button: exit game

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Sega SG-1000

RG350 emulator: Genesis Plus GX (2019-12-23) (source)
Recommended game file types: .zip

To set up the Sega SG-1000, download and unzip the Genesis Plus GX emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/SG1000 folder of your external SD card. Note that the games (which are typically in .sg file format) must be in .zip format in order to be recognized by Genesis Plus GX.

Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER or START + SELECT: Genesis Plus GX menu
SELECT + L1: quicksave to savestate 1
SELECT + R1: quickload savestate 1

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Sega Master System

RG350 emulator: Genesis Plus GX (2019-12-23) (source)
Recommended game file types: .sms

To set up the Sega Master System, download and unzip the Genesis Plus GX emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Master System folder of your external SD card.

  • Genesis Plus GX only supports Game Genie cheats for the Sega Genesis, but you could always patch cheats directly into your Master System ROM files. See my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more information.
Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER or START + SELECT: Genesis Plus GX menu
SELECT + L1: quicksave to savestate 1
SELECT + R1: quickload savestate 1

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Sega Genesis (Mega Drive)

RG350 emulator: Picodrive or Genesis Plus GX (2019-12-23)
Recommended game file types: .bin

The Sega Genesis runs on either Picodrive or Genesis Plus GX. I tend to prefer Picodrive, because it also supports external USB controllers for two-player gameplay. To set up the Sega Genesis, download and unzip the Genesis Plus GX and/or Picodrive emulators and place them in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Genesis folder of your external SD card.

  • The other common Genesis ROM file type, .md files, will have issues loading with these emulators.
  • Genesis Plus GX supports Game Genie codes, or you can also patch cheats directly into your Sega Genesis ROM files. See my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more information.
Controls/Hotkeys (Picodrive):
SELECT button: Picodrive menu
R2 button: quicksave
L2 button: quickload

Controls/Hotkeys (Genesis Plus GX):
POWER or START + SELECT: Genesis Plus GX menu
SELECT + L1: quicksave to savestate 1
SELECT + R1: quickload savestate 1

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Sega CD (Mega CD)

RG350 emulator: Picodrive or Genesis Plus GX (2019-12-23)
Recommended game file types: .bin/.cue

To set up the Sega CD (Mega CD), download and unzip the Picodrive emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Sega CD folder of your external SD card. The Sega CD requires BIOS files, but they are pre-packaged in the Picodrive emulator. This version of Picodrive also supports external USB controllers for two-player gameplay.

Note that the Sega CD will only work if your files are in .bin and .cue format — .bin files are binary format used in backups of CD files, and .cue files are text files that defines the organization of those .bin files. Each game will need its own folder. For example, within the ROMS/Sega CD/Sonic CD folder, you will have something that looks like this:

Sonic CD (Track 1).bin
Sonic CD (Track 2).bin
Sonic CD (Track 3).bin
Sonic CD (Track 4).bin
Sonic CD (Track 5).bin
...and so on...
Sonic CD (Track 35).bin
Sonic CD.cue

You need all 35 of these .bin files, as well as the .cue file. If you renamed these files at any point, you will need to open up the .cue file using a text editor (Notepad on PC, or TextEdit on Mac) and make sure that the .cue file is pointing to the right .bin file names. Below is an example of the .cue file for Eternal Champions opened in a text editor. Make sure that the .bin files referenced in the .cue file are properly named; so in this case, if you had a .bin file named “Eternal Champions.bin”, you’d want to remove the “(U)” from this .cue file description.

In order to properly start the game, you will open Picodrive and navigate to the .cue file (it’s easy to find, it’ll be the last file in the folder). Opening up a .bin file will result in an error. Similarly, trying to load Sega CD files from other formats (.zip, .chd) will not work.

If you’re looking for the fastest possible gameplay experience, this version of Picodrive runs the fastest I’ve seen, but has occasional graphics and compatibility issues. Note that this version does not have hotkeys for quicksave/quickload.

  • The Genesis Plus GX emulator also supports Sega CD games, but I find them to run more slowly than with Picodrive. This emulator supports .iso files. If you want to use the Genesis Plus GX emulator for Sega CD games, you will need to add the three BIOS files (bios_CD_E.bin, bios_CD_J.bin, and bios_CD_U.bin) to the media/data/local/home/.genplus/roms folder on your internal SD card. Note that for this emulator, you will need to open the first .bin file in the folder for it to run the game.
Controls/Hotkeys (Picodrive):
SELECT button: Picodrive menu
R2 button: quicksave
L2 button: quickload

Controls/Hotkeys (Genesis Plus GX):
POWER or START + SELECT: Genesis Plus GX menu
SELECT + L1: quicksave to savestate 1
SELECT + R1: quickload savestate 1

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Sega 32X (Mega Drive 32X)

RG350 emulator: Picodrive (source)
Recommended game file types: .zip

To set up the Sega 32x, download and unzip the Picodrive emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/32x folder of your external SD card.

  • There are various versions of Picodrive floating around, the version linked above is the only one that will play 32x games at full speed. This version of Picodrive also supports external USB controllers for two-player gameplay. If you’re looking for the fastest possible gameplay experience, this version of Picodrive runs the fastest I’ve seen, but has occasional graphics issues. Note that this version does not have hotkeys for quicksave/quickload.
Controls/Hotkeys:
SELECT button: Picodrive menu
R2 button: quicksave
L2 button: quickload

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Sony PlayStation

RG350 emulator:
PCSX4all (2020-01-13) (source)
PCSX4all (2020-03-13) for RG350M

Recommended game file types: .bin/.cue, .pbp

To set up the Sony PlayStation, download and unzip the PCSX4All emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/PSX folder of your external SD card. The PlayStation requires BIOS files, but they are pre-packaged in the PCSX4all emulator. If for some reason you lose them, or have an error, you will need to add the scph1001.bin BIOS to the /media/data/local/home/.pcsx4all/bios folder on your internal SD card.

Note that the PlayStation will only work if your files are in .bin and .cue or .pbp format — .bin files are binary format used in backups of CD files, and .cue files are text files that defines the organization of those .bin files. Each game with .bin/.cue files will need its own folder. For example, within the ROMS/PSX/Castlevania – Symphony of the Night folder, you will have something that looks like this:

Castlevania - Symphony of the Night (Track 1).bin
Castlevania - Symphony of the Night (Track 2).bin
Castlevania - Symphony of the Night.cue

You need both of these .bin files, as well as the .cue file to properly run the game. If you renamed these files at any point, you will need to open up the .cue file using a text editor (Notepad on PC, or TextEdit on Mac) and make sure that the .cue file is pointing to the right .bin file names. Below is an example of the .cue file for Metal Gear Solid opened in a text editor. Make sure that the .bin files referenced in the .cue file are properly named; so in this case, if you had a .bin file named “Metal Gear Solid (Disc 1).bin, you’d want to remove the “(v.1.1)” from this .cue file.

In order to properly start the game, you will open PCSX4all and navigate to the .cue file (it’s easy to find, it’ll be the last file in the folder). Opening up a .bin file will result in an error. Similarly, trying to load PlayStation files from other formats (.zip, .chd) will not work.

  • If you are having issues with game performance, I recommend you disable “HLE BIOS” in the PCSX4All Core Settings and make sure the “Set BIOS File” (also in Core Settings) is set to scph1001.bin (and you have that file in the /media/data/local/home/.pcsx4all/bios folder on your internal SD card). HLE stands for “high level emulation”, and it is software-derived BIOS files that are sometimes not as accurate as the actual BIOS file.
  • PCSX4all also supports .pbp format. This is a nice format for multi-disc games, like Final Fantasy VII, because it combines all of the discs into one .pbp file. If you have .bin and .cue files and want to convert them to .pbp, you will first need to combine the .bin files into one single .bin file (here is a good video tutorial), then convert the .bin/.cue files to .pbp using PSX2PSP.
  • PCS4all has a robust cheat system, which is easy to set up and use. See my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more information.
  • If you want a version of PCSX4all that supports external USB controllers for two-player gameplay, check out this emulator from GitHub user valentecaio. Note that this emulator also allows you to change the RG350 gamepad buttons to player two; in other words, when you’re stuck at Psycho Mantis in Metal Gear Solid, just go into the menu, select “Input settings”, then “Native buttons”, and swap it to Player 2. This could also be a solution if you prefer to play fighting games as Player 2 (i.e. starting on the right side of the screen).
Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER button: PCSX4All menu

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Turbo Grafx-16 (PC Engine)

RG350 emulator: Temper v1.24 (source)
Recommended game file types: .pce

To set up the Turbo Grafx-16, download and unzip the Temper emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/TG16 folder of your external SD card.

  • Temper does not support cheats, but you could always patch cheats directly into your TG-16 ROM files. See my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more information.
  • There is a PCE version of the Mednafen emulator that runs TurboGrafx-16 games. I was able to successfully boot games in Mednafen that I couldn’t with Temper (like Akumajou Dracula X on the TurboGrafx-CD). To exit out of Mednafen, press SELECT + Y, and to map the buttons, press SELECT + B. There is no on-screen configuration option, you must edit a configuration file found at /media/data/local/home/.mednafen/mednafen-09x.cfg (for more details, read this guide). Even when toggling the “fullscreen” setting in the config file, I was not able to get the games running in full screen. In order to get the audio to work, you must change the following settings in the config file:
;Select sound output device.
sound.device sexyal-literal-default

and

;Specifies the sound playback rate, in sound frames per second("Hz").
sound.rate 44100
Controls/Hotkeys:
SELECT button: Temper menu

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Turbo Grafx-CD (PC Engine CD)

RG350 emulator: Temper v1.24 (source)
Recommended game file types: .ogg/.iso/.cue

To set up the TurboGrafx-CD, download and unzip the Temper emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/TGCD folder of your external SD card. In order for the system to work, its BIOS (boot) file, which is named syscard3.pce, must be placed in the media/data/local/home/.temper/syscards folder.

Note that the TurboGrafx-CD files are in a .ogg/.iso/.cue format. The .ogg files behave like .bin files in other systems, and the .iso files are usually the second track. Like with other systems, .cue files are what actually boot the games. Each game will need these files placed in its own folder. For example, within the ROMS/TGCD/Beyond Shadowgate folder, you will have something that looks like this:

Beyond Shadowgate-01.ogg
Beyond Shadowgate-02.iso
Beyond Shadowgate-03.ogg
Beyond Shadowgate-04.ogg
... and so on...
Beyond Shadowgate-36.ogg
Beyond Shadowgate.cue

If you renamed these files at any point, you will need to open up the .cue file using a text editor (Notepad on PC, or TextEdit on Mac) and make sure that the .cue file is pointing to the right .ogg and .iso file names.

In order to properly start the game, you will open Temper and navigate to the .cue file (it’s easy to find, it’ll be the last file in the folder). Opening up the other files will result in an error. Similarly, trying to load TurboGrafx-CD games from other formats (.zip in particular) will not work. In some cases, I have seen traditional .bin/.cue files work fine.

  • There is a PCE version of the Mednafen emulator that runs TurboGrafx-CD games. I was able to successfully boot games in Mednafen that I couldn’t with Temper (like Akumajou Dracula X). You will need to add the syscard3.pce BIOS file to media/data/local/home/.mednafen on your internal SD card in order for the games to boot. To exit out of Mednafen, press SELECT + Y, and to map the buttons, press SELECT + B. There is no on-screen configuration option, you must edit a configuration file found at /media/data/local/home/.mednafen/mednafen-09x.cfg (for more details, read this guide). Even when toggling the “fullscreen” setting in the config file, I was not able to get the games running in full screen. In order to get the audio to work, you must change the following settings in the config file:
;Select sound output device.
sound.device sexyal-literal-default

and

;Specifies the sound playback rate, in sound frames per second("Hz").
sound.rate 44100
Controls/Hotkeys:
SELECT button: Temper menu

return to Table of Contents


Panasonic 3DO

RG350 emulator: 3DOh_gcw0 (source)
Recommended game file types: .iso

The Panasonic 3DO can play on the RG350, albeit poorly. I was only able to get about 10 frames per second, making it virtually unplayable. To set up the 3DO, download and unzip the 3DOh emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/3DO folder of your external SD card. In order for the system to work, its BIOS (boot) file, which must be named bios.bin, and placed in the media/data/local/home/.3doh folder.

Note that the 3DOh will only play .iso files. If you have .bin/.cue files, use a program like OPL Manager to convert them to .iso.

Here’s a gameplay video for a few 3DO games running on an RG350:

Controls/Hotkeys:
SELECT button: exit game

return to Table of Contents


Nintendo Game & Watch

RG350 emulator: gw (2020-03-18) (source)
Recommended game file types: .mgw

To set up Game & Watch, download and unzip the gw emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Gane and Watch folder of your external SD card.

Game & Watch ROMs are unique because the emulator will recreate the experience of these old handheld devices, which had any number of screens and orientation. See some gameplay in the short video below:

Controls/Hotkeys:
SELECT button (x2): exit game
START button: view controls

return to Table of Contents


Nintendo Game Boy

RG350 emulators:
GamBatte-DMS for RG350/RG350P
GamBatte-DMS for RG350M

Recommended game file types: .gb

To set up the Nintendo Game Boy, download and unzip the GamBatte (2020-06-28) emulator for your respective device, and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/GB folder of your external SD card.

  • This GamBatte emulator can play both Game Boy Color and original Game Boy games, and is frequently updated with new features and fixes. The RG350M has extra video scaling options, to include Dox Matrix 3x and CRT 3x. Be sure to check out the release page in case another update sneaks by without my notice.
  • GamBatte has a robust cheat system, see my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more information.
Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER or R1: GamBatte menu
L1: Fast Forward (must be enabled in menu)

return to Table of Contents


Nintendo Game Boy Color

RG350 emulators:
GamBatte-DMS for RG350/RG350P
GamBatte-DMS for RG350M

Recommended game file types: .gbc

To set up the Nintendo Game Boy, download and unzip the GamBatte (2020-06-28) emulator for your respective device, and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/GBC folder of your external SD card.

  • This GamBatte emulator can play both Game Boy Color and original Game Boy games, and is frequently updated with new features and fixes. The RG350M has extra video scaling options, to include Dox Matrix 3x and CRT 3x. Be sure to check out the release page in case another update sneaks by without my notice.
  • GamBatte has a robust cheat system, see my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more information.
  • ROMs that are “Super Game Boy (SGB) enhanced” may have issues loading correctly on this emulator. I had several GBC games that would run in the original Game Boy green/black color, but in full color with other emulators. Replacing those ROMs with those that didn’t have any SGB enhancement fixed this issue for me.
Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER or R1: GamBatte menu
L1: Fast Forward (must be enabled in menu)

return to Table of Contents


Nintendo Game Boy Advance

RG350 emulator:
ReGBA (2020-09-21) for RG350/RG350P (source)
ReGBA (2020-09-21) for RG350M (source)

Recommended game file types: .gba

To set up the Nintendo Game Boy Advance, download and unzip the ReGBA emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/GBA folder of your external SD card.

  • The emulators linked above support external controllers via an OTG adapter.
  • The GBA emulation community is very robust and enthusiastic, and there are many versions of ReGBA floating around. The base ReGBA is dated 2019-12-26 (source), but some forks, like this one from GitHub user valentecaio, implements external control support. The versions linked above incorporate the external gamepad support and offers a couple extra features, like hardware (x2) scaling (for RG350M), scanline image scalers, color correction, and interframe blending.
  • ReGBA does not support cheats, but another emulator, GPSP (source) does. I prefer ReGBA over GPSP because it supports hardware scaling, and the games look much better. But if you want to try GPSP and its cheats system, check out my Ultimate Cheats Guide.
  • For the best performance, I like to set the ReGBA Display Settings to boot from the GBA BIOS, and with hardware scaling (and hardware x2 for RG350M). To display the game across the entire screen, you can press START + A to re-widen the screen. Here is a video to demonstrate the emulators:
Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER button: ReGBA menu

You can also bind quicksave/quickload buttons in the “Hotkeys…” setting in the ReGBA menu.

return to Table of Contents


Nintendo DS

RG350 emulator: Desmume (2016-01-22) (source)
Recommended game file types: .nds

There is a Nintendo DS emulator that “works” with the RG350 devices. It hasn’t been updated in nearly five years, and only runs at about 5-10 frames per second, making it unplayable. Both screens are shown at once, with no option to adjust anything — the touchscreen is also not functioning, for obvious reasons.

If you want to try it out, download and unzip the Desmume emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card (if it’s not there already). Place the game files in the ROMS/NDS folder of your external SD card.

Here’s a gameplay video for a few DS games running on an RG350. Note that Mario Kart DS actually crashed before the race started:

Controls/Hotkeys:
SELECT button: exit game

return to Table of Contents


Sega Game Gear

RG350 emulator: Genesis Plus GX (2019-12-23) (source)
Recommended game file types: .gg

To set up the Sega Game Gear, download and unzip the Genesis Plus GX emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card (if it’s not there already). Place the game files in the ROMS/Game Gear folder of your external SD card. Genesis Plus GX does not support Game Genie cheats for the Game Gear, but you could patch them directly into the Game Gear ROM if you’d like; see my Ultimate Cheats Guide for more information.

Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER or START + SELECT: Genesis Plus GX menu
SELECT + L1: quicksave to savestate 1
SELECT + R1: quickload savestate 1

return to Table of Contents


Neo Geo Pocket & Neo Geo Pocket Color

RG350 emulator: Race (source)
Recommended game file types: .zip

To set up the Neo Geo Pocket and Neo Geo Pocket Color, download and unzip the Race emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Neo Geo Pocket folder of your external SD card. Note that this emulator will play both Neo Geo Pocket and Neo Geo Pocket Color games.

Controls/Hotkeys:
START + SELECT: Race menu

return to Table of Contents


Watara Supervision (QuickShot Supervision)

RG350 emulator: Potator (2013-09-17) (source)
Recommended game file types: .sv

To set up the Watara Supervision, download and unzip the Potator emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Supervision folder of your external SD card.

Controls/Hotkeys:
START + SELECT: Potator menu

return to Table of Contents


Atari Lynx

RG350 emulator: Handy (source)
Recommended game file types: .lnx

To set up the Atari Lynx, download and unzip the Handy emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Atari Lynx folder of your external SD card.

Controls/Hotkeys:
POWER or SELECT button: Handy menu

return to Table of Contents


Wonderswan & Wonderswan Color

RG350 emulator: OSwan (source)
Recommended game file types: .ws, .wsc

To set up the Wonderswan and Wonderswan Color, download and unzip the Handy emulator and place it in the media/data/apps/ folder of your internal SD card. Place the game files in the ROMS/Wonderswan folder of your external SD card. Note that this emulator will play both Wonderswan and Wonderswan Color games.

Controls/Hotkeys:
SELECT button: OSwan menu

return to Table of Contents


Changelog

In this section I’ll provide a quick summary of any updates I make to this guide.


21SEP2020
– added updated ReGBA emulator with color correction fix

19SEP2020
– added updated ReGBA emulator with scanline suppor
– moved ColecoVision over from Home Computers guide

18SEP2020
– added updated ReGBA emulator with improved hardware (x2) scaling in addition to yesterday’s updates
– added video to highlight newReGBA emulator
– removed ReGBAm emulator link since this new ReGBA has better display performance and features on the RG350M than ReGBAm did

17SEP2020
– added ReGBA emulator with color correction
– added anchor links to Changelog

12SEP2020
– added “return to Table of Contents” for easier navigation

11SEP2020
– added guides grid to top of page

08SEP2020
– added Atari 800 and Atari 5200
– design tweaks (darkened separator lines)

07SEP2020
– added fast forward hotkeys for GamBatte
– added info about SGB enhanced GBC color games issue
– added .cue renaming requirements for PS1, Sega CD, and TG-16/PC Engine CD
– added HLE BIOS info for PS1
– added references to my Ultimate Cheats Guide for relevant systems
– added GPSP as an emulator option for GBA

05SEP2020
– added updated links to the arcade and home computer guides

03SEP2020
– added Vectrex, Sega SG1000, and Watara Supervision.
– added (source) links to any files that are hosted on this site but originated elsewhere

I hope this guide gets you set up with all of your favorite retro games. If you have a question, comment, or suggestion, please leave me a comment below, or send me a note directly.

18 thoughts on “Guide: How to load games onto the RG350 (Home Consoles and Handhelds)

  1. Great guide, helped me set up a lot of the emulators I wanted, however the N64 seems to not work and crashes within a few seconds on Rogue 1.7.10.

    Like

    1. Hi, I’m happy to hear that the guide has been helpful! I have yet to tackle Rogue firmware, but plan to soon. After then I should be able to give more advice on anything related to that firmware…stay tuned!

      Like

  2. HI there, I followed this for the new RG350M ps1 opk. After I have place the opk in the apps folder and restart the machine. The new emulator is not in my emulators list. Would you have any idea why? I am on stock firmware. I currently have 18 emulators showing on the emulators tab. IS there a limit to how many can be shown etc?

    Like

    1. Hmmm, that is odd. There is no limit on emulators, I have had close to 50 installed at one time on my RG350M while testing. Maybe try adding the .opk to your external card to see if it picks it up that way. On the external card, just make a folder named “APPS” in the root directory (so F:/APPS if your SD card appears as “F:” in Windows), and place the .opk there. Let me know how that goes!

      Like

      1. Hmm… Cheat support in ReGBA looks like a lot of work, unfortunately. There’s no dingux-specific code for it at all, nor is the menu system geared up for it.

        I’m primarily a RetroArch developer. We’re planning on looking at improved RG350M support, and this ReGBA work was essentially just me playing around with the toolchain (making sure it works, and so on). I’m afraid I don’t really have the resources for major updates to stand-alone emulators… πŸ™‚

        However, I did just push one more release of ReGBA which adds a new “Hardware (x2)” image scaler. This *hugely* improves image quality, so it might be nice to update the link in your guide again (sorry for the extra work!) πŸ˜‰

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Thanks for the insight on your process, I appreciate that. I figured that implementing cheats wasn’t as simple as turning on a setting, considering that no one had done it yet. That’s exciting to hear about improved RetroArch support! I haven’t installed it on my device yet, that’s one of my goals for the site soon.

        I’m really liking this new ReGBA, thanks for your work on it! I have actually replaced the ReGBAm emulator with yours as well, as yours seems to look and perform better. I might make a quick video showcasing your new emulator, if I get the time today!

        Like

    1. Hi. I love what you’ve done to ReGBA. Excellent work.

      I was wondering: how hard would it be to implement a grid-lcd filter like on Gambatte for better accuracy?

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      1. If you have the 350M, the latest version of Gambette has a Scaler option called Dot Matrix 3x, which is exactly what you need. Unfortunately that option only works on the M because of the 640×480 screen.

        Like

  3. @jdgleaver These new ReGBA releases are absolutely fantastic. They take the GBA from being one of the worst-looking things on the system to being one of the best.

    I see you’re a RetroArch dev, which is exciting for future development on this platform for sure. How possible do you think a similar 2X hardware scaling method would be to implement for FCEUX and PocketSNES? Those are the last two major systems that have incredibly blurry scaling on the RG350M screen (Genesis and PC Engine are handled okay, and while things like NGPC and Lynx have scaling issues, I certainly wouldn’t put them on the level of NES or SNES in popularity), since the software scaling still assumes a 240p screen and the hardware scaling is working from such a small initial image, and it’d be great to see those with the same scaler as ReGBA, either in individual updates or through RetroArch.

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