Guide: PortMaster on Retro Handheld Devices

Guide: PortMaster on Retro Handheld Devices

Last updated: 21SEP2021

PortMaster is a new tool developed by ChristianHaitian (ArkOS developer) and a few other community members, which allows you to easily install various ports on Ubuntu-based operating systems running on the RK3326 chipset, such as ArkOS and The Retro Arena (TheRA). Compatibility with the RetroOZ firmware is in the works, as well as for 351ELEC. PortMaster support currently includes the following devices:

Anbernic RG351P (ArkOS final)
Anbernic RG351M (ArkOS final)
Anbernic RG351V (ArkOS)
PowKiddy RGB10 (ArkOS)
GameForce Chi (ArkOS)
RK2020 (ArkOS)
ODROID Go Advance (ArkOS)
ODROID Go Super (The RetroArena, RetroOZ)
PowKiddy RGB10 Max (The Retro Arena, RetroOZ)

So in this guide I’ll walk you through how to use this simple tool to get some of your favorite ports up and running on your device. Note that your device will need to be connected to the Internet for this to work!

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Guide: Demons of Asteborg on Retro Handhelds

Guide: Demons of Asteborg on Retro Handhelds

Nearly 33 years after the Sega Genesis released, we have a new game to try out! Demons of Asteborg released last month and can easily work in your favorite retro handheld. If it can run Genesis games (and the Picodrive emulator), it’ll likely run this game, too.

Find it on Steam
Main page (for the demo)

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RG350 & RG280 Series Starter Guide

RG350 & RG280 Series Starter Guide

Last updated: 16SEP2021

At long last, we have a definitive firmware image for Anbernic RG350 and RG280 series retro handheld devices. This “Adam” image will allow you to create the ultimate SD card image that runs OpenDingux Beta firmware, RetroArch and standalone emulators, and the SimpleMenu frontend all in one seamless experience. No FTPing, tweaking, or headaches required.

This starter guide will work on the following devices: Anbernic RG350, RG350P, RG350M, RG280M, RG280V, RG300X, PlayGo, PocketGo 2, PowKiddy Q80, GCW-Zero, and probably a few others not on my radar.

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Guide: Streets of Rage Remix on RG351 Devices

Guide: Streets of Rage Remix on RG351 Devices

Last updated: 08AUG2021

Streets of Rage Remake is a beloved game among emulation and homebrew fans. First released in 2011 after eight years of development, this fan-made game mashes together the first three Streets of Rage games and adds in over 100 stages, 15+ playable characters, and an epic soundtrack. Sadly, the game was pulled down from official release at the request of SEGA, but has remained available on various websites over the years.

Porting SoRR to a device is a right of passage for any true retro handheld, so today let’s walk through how to play this game on the Anbernic RG351P, RG351M, and RG351V.

Note that you will need to be running ArkOS custom firmware for this to work. This is easily one of my favorite custom firmwares for these devices, and you can install it on the ArkOS wiki page. This guide will work on other devices that are supported by ArkOS, such as the RGB10, RK2020, and GameForce Chi.

The ArkOS developer plans on implementing the SoRR folder structure in a future update, but for now, the instructions will get you on your way. Once the changes happen in the firmware, I will modify this guide accordingly.

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Turn a USB Flash Drive into a Portable Gaming Console using Batocera

Turn a USB Flash Drive into a Portable Gaming Console using Batocera

The Batocera firmware lets you flash a lightweight, emulation-focused operating system onto any flash drive, hard drive, or SD card. So what if we flashed it onto a flash drive, loaded it all up, and then used that as a portable gaming “system” that could be plugged into any Windows PC? That’s what we’re going to explore in this video.

Download Batocera
Batocera wiki
Batocera Nation YouTube channel

USB flash drive
Rii USB wireless keyboard
8bitDo Pro 2 controller

Note that you can use any number of storage solutions to host your Batocera operating system, like an external HDD/SDD, and internal drive installed into your PC, or even a SD card if you have a built-in (or USB) reader.

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Super Console X King Review & Guide

Super Console X King Review & Guide

Last updated: 27JUL2021

The Super Console X King is a rebranded version of the beloved Beelink GT King Android TV box, but pre-loaded with EmuELEC 4.2 and a bunch of games. Let’s see how this performs as an all-in-one retro gaming console.

Buy one here (AliExpress)
Amazon (more expensive but faster)
Directly from the vendor

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TrimUI Model S (PowKiddy A66) — Updated Review & Guide

TrimUI Model S (PowKiddy A66) — Updated Review & Guide

Last updated: 11JUL2021

The tiny TrimUI Model S (now rebranded as the PowKiddy A66) has received a lot of excellent development over the past few months, so it’s time for me to revisit my initial review. And while I initially recommended avoiding this device, these new updates have changed my mind — this is now a device worth considering. Let’s check it out.

Buy one here (PowKiddy A66)
Buy the old TrimUI Model S

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Retro Game Emulation on an iPhone

Retro Game Emulation on an iPhone

Last updated: 02SEP2021 (see Changelog for details)

The iPhone can do a lot of things seamlessly, and it’s a very powerful device. But something as simple as running an NES game can be quite challenging. So let’s set up your iPhone as a retro game emulation device — no jailbreaking required.

Like with my previous video about gaming on an iPhone (which covered standalone games, Apple Arcade, and streaming), the Backbone One is an essential component of gaming on iOS. There are other options available, like the Razer Kishi or GameSir X2 BT controller, but the Backbone One is miles better than these options thanks to its ease of use and helpful app integration.

One final note before we get started: emulation on iOS is a moving target. With each new iOS update, some things may get broken, or (very rarely) things might actually improve. My advice is to be patient with new iOS updates, and give the development teams to catch up. I’ll keep this guide updated with the latest developments going forward.

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