Anbernic RG35XX Starter Guide

Last updated: 31JAN2022 (see Changelog for details)

In this guide I will show you how to set up the new GarlicOS game launcher to greatly improve the Anbernic RG35XX user experience.

Where to buy the RG35XX:
Anbernic website
AliExpress
Amazon (more expensive but faster shipping and easy returns)

GarlicOS is provided as a community build thanks to the work of developer Black Seraph. If you have the means, please consider leaving him a tip jar donation to thank him for his efforts.

Table of Contents
Getting started
Recommended software tools
Install GarlicOS (single-card setup)
Install GarlicOS (dual-card setup)
Add BIOS files
Add game files
Updating GarlicOS
Set the real-time clock (RTC)
Overclocking (or underclocking) the RG35XX
Changing the GarlicOS skin
Adding boxart to the menus
Additional tips

Changelog
Sandisk (left) and Samsung (right) microSD cards

Getting started

The RG35XX will come bundled with a single microSD card, and in some cases two SD cards, but they are from a generic brand and will be prone to failure. The “TF1/INT” slot on your device holds the system firmware, so for that card 16GB is ideal. The “TF2/EXT” slot is for your game files, so you will want a larger card for that one. You can either use a single-card setup to host both your system files and the games on one card, or you can separate the two functions using a dual SD card setup. In this guide I will show you how to set up each method.

Your safest bet is to replace your cards with microSD cards from a well-known brand, which will prevent the cards from getting corrupted over time. I recommend you store that original card somewhere safe in case you run into any issues in the future, and buy new SD cards from a reputable brand like SanDisk or Samsung to use in your device.

In general, I recommend the cards listed below, in order of preference. The prices fluctuate all the time, so keep an eye out for deals. In general, I would expect to pay about $7 for a 16GB card, $12 for a 64GB card, and $17 for a 128GB card. For the SD2 slot, I recommend a 64GB or 128GB card, which will allow you to load EVERY 8-bit and 16-bit game out there, all of the arcade games that work, and a large number of PS1, Sega CD, and TurboGrafx-CD games (those systems have the largest file sizes). You can use an even larger SD2 card (like 256GB) but I think it’s overkill for a low-powered device like the RG35XX.

16GB cards: 
SanDisk Ultra  
SanDisk Industrial (more reliable but pricey)

64GB cards:
SanDisk Extreme
Samsung EVO Select
Samsung Ultra

128GB cards:
SanDisk Extreme
Samsung EVO Select
SanDisk Ultra

One more accessory to consider: if you don’t have a nice microSD to USB adapter, you might want to think about getting one. A nice adapter like this one from Anker will give you the fastest transfer speeds possible, and won’t cause any corruption issues with your card.

Finally, I would recommend that you build your ROM library now, if you haven’t already. The device comes with a bunch of games, but they are poorly organized, in the Chinese language, or just outright buggy. Make a folder called “ROMS” or something like it, and make distinct folders for each of the systems you would like to play on your device. I recommend naming your game folders after the “Rom Folder” names found in this guide, because that’s how they’ll be organized on your device when using GarlicOS. For best results, unzip your files with the exception of Arcade/NeoGeo titles.

Recommended software tools

There are several Windows-based tools we are going to use to ensure the smoothest installation possible. So before getting started, go through this list and install these (free) applications to your computer.

7Zip — The GarlicOS SD card image will come in the .7z file format, so you will want to install 7Zip on your computer so you can extract the .img file within.

Balena Etcher — This tool will flash the .img file to your SD1 card.

DiskGenius — This tool will allow you to expand the ROMS partition on your SD1 card, to make space for your BIOS files (and game files if you want to put them there, too).

GUIformat — This FAT32 format tool will format your SD2 card to the FAT32 file system, so that the RG35XX can recognize the card and its contents. This is necessary if you are going to use an SD2 card that is larger than 32GB in size.

Install GarlicOS (single-card setup)

Head over to Black Seraph’s website and follow the link to Anbernic RG35XX. There you will find a Patreon post with a description and links to GarlicOS, the custom operating system modeled after the popular Miyoo Mini custom interface known as OnionOS. You do not need to be a member of his Patreon page to download GarlicOS, but please consider supporting his work if you have the means to do so.

At the bottom of the post you will see two files:

RG35XX-Garlic-CopyPasteOnTopOfStock.7z
RG35XX-Garlic-MicroSDCardImage.7z

Download the second option, “RG35XX-Garlic-MicroSDCardImage.7z” and save it to your computer. Using 7Zip, extract the .7z file and you should have two files: a readme file and the garlic.img file. Using Balena Etcher, flash the garlic.img file to your SD1 card. When the flash completes, you may get a bunch of pop ups warning you to format the partitions — ignore them.

Open up DiskGenius and find the SD1 card in the lefthand menu. It should have four partitions. One of them is FAT32 formatted; if it doesn’t have a drive letter assigned to it, right-click on it in the left menu and Assign a Drive Letter. Once you have a drive letter, you should be able to access this partition using the regular Windows Explorer; within this partition should be a list of three folders:

  • BIOS
  • ROMs
  • CFW

On your computer, make a copy the of ROMS folder as a backup.

Next we’re going to expand the SD1 card so that we can take advantage of all its available space. In Disk Genius, right-click on the FAT32 partition and select “Resize Partition”. Drag the partition so that it takes up all available space, then select “START”. This process may error out, and if it does, you want to DELETE that FAT32 partition and make a new one (that takes up the whole free space) and name it ROMS. Then, move the three backed-up folders (BIOS, ROMs, and CFW) to that partition and you are good to go.

MAC USERS: use The Unarchiver to extract the .7z file, then flash the SD1 card using the Mac version of Balena Etcher. To expand the partition, I recommend following these steps made by Reddit user occaisionalevergreen. When formatting an SD2 card that is over 32GB in size, use Disk Utility and format it to the “MS-DOS(FAT)” format.

If after moving your ROMs over you experience a bunch of files that have a “.” in front of them and won’t launch, they are AppleDouble files that can be cleaned by opening Terminal and typing “dot_clean” and the path to your SD card, then pressing the ENTER key. You can easily get your SD card’s path by dragging the drive icon into Terminal.

Install GarlicOS (dual-card setup)

Head over to Black Seraph’s website and follow the link to Anbernic RG35XX. There you will find a Patreon post with a description and links to GarlicOS, the custom operating system modeled after the popular Miyoo Mini custom interface known as OnionOS. You do not need to be a member of his Patreon page to download GarlicOS, but please consider supporting his work if you have the means to do so.

At the bottom of the post you will see two files:

RG35XX-Garlic-CopyPasteOnTopOfStock.7z
RG35XX-Garlic-MicroSDCardImage.7z

Download the second option, “RG35XX-Garlic-MicroSDCardImage.7z” and save it to your computer. Using 7Zip, extract the .7z file and you should have two files: a readme file and the garlic.img file. Using Balena Etcher, flash the garlic.img file to your SD1 card. When the flash completes, you may get a bunch of pop ups warning you to format the partitions — ignore them.

Open up DiskGenius and find the SD1 card in the lefthand menu. It should have four partitions. One of them is FAT32 formatted; if it doesn’t have a drive letter assigned to it, right-click on it in the left menu and Assign a Drive Letter. Once you have a drive letter, you should be able to access this partition using the regular Windows Explorer; within this partition should be a list of three folders:

  • BIOS
  • ROMs
  • CFW

On your computer, make a copy the of these folders as a backup.

Next, take your SD2 card and format it using the GUIformat tool linked in the Recommended software tools section above. Next, move the BIOS and ROMS folders to the SD2 card and you are good to go.

OPTIONAL: If you want to also host ROMS on your SD1 card, you can expand the SD1 card so that we can take advantage of all its available space. In Disk Genius, right-click on the FAT32 partition and select “Resize Partition”. Drag the partition so that it takes up all available space, then select “START”. This process may error out, and if it does, you want to DELETE that FAT32 partition and make a new one (that takes up the whole free space) and name it ROMS. Then, move the three backed-up folders (BIOS, ROMs, and CFW) to that partition and you are done.

In summary, this is how your file structure should look on a dual-card setup:

SD1:
FAT16 system partition.  System files, with names like "dmenu.bin", "modules" folder, etc.

FAT32 storage partition:
BIOS folder (optional, only if you have ROMs on this card too)
CFW folder
Roms folder (optional)
Saves folder (optional, auto-generated)

SD2:
BIOS folder
Roms folder
Saves folder (auto-generated)

MAC USERS: use The Unarchiver to extract the .7z file, then flash the SD1 card using the Mac version of Balena Etcher. If you want to expand the SD1 card partition, I recommend following these steps made by Reddit user occaisionalevergreen. When formatting an SD2 card that is over 32GB in size, use Disk Utility and format it to the “MS-DOS(FAT)” format.

If after moving your ROMs over you experience a bunch of files that have a “.” in front of them and won’t launch, they are AppleDouble files that can be cleaned by opening Terminal and typing “dot_clean” and the path to your SD card, then pressing the ENTER key. You can easily get your SD card’s path by dragging the drive icon into Terminal.

Add BIOS files

BIOS files are system files that allow certain emulator cores to function properly. These files are copyrighted and so no links to them will be found on this website, but here is a list of the BIOS files I recommend adding to the folder. Note that many systems, like NES, Genesis, SNES, etc., don’t require BIOS files.

UPDATE: In the video above I placed the BIOS files in CFW > retroarch > .retroarch > system, but that is no longer necessary. BIOS files now have their own folder, you can place them directly there. Note that the BIOS files need to be on the same card as the game files. This gives you the option to place certain BIOS on one card for certain games, and other BIOS on the other card with other games.

Recommended BIOS files:

SEGA CD:
bios_CD_E.bin
bios_CD_J.bin
bios_CD_U.bin

FAMICOM DISK SYSTEM:
disksys.rom

GAME BOY (for boot logo):
gb_bios.bin

GAME BOY COLOR (for boot logo):
gbc_bios.bin

GAME BOY ADVANCE:
gba_bios.bin

NEO GEO:
neogeo.zip (placed in Neo Geo ROMs folder)

PLAYSTATION:
scph5501.bin

TURBOGRAFX-CD:
syscard1.pce
syscard2.pce
syscard3.pce

One exception is the Neo Geo BIOS file (neogeo.zip), this is not placed in the BIOS folder but in the same folder as your Neo Geo ROMs.

There are other supported systems that require BIOS files, like ColecoVision and Amiga. For those systems, I recommend consulting this table from OnionOS for more information.

Add game files

Now that we have flashed GarlicOS and added the BIOS files to the card, we’re ready to move the ROM files onto your desired card.

Find the ROMS folder of whatever card you plan on using, and drag and drop your ROM files into their respective folder. For the most accurate list of what every folder represents, I recommend consulting the OnionOS emulators section to see the folder name, corresponding system, and accepted ROM file type.

Once you have added your games, you are ready to go. Insert your card(s) into the RG35XX and enjoy!

Updating GarlicOS

As GarlicOS continues to develop, I would expect frequent updates. Thankfully, updating the system is relatively easy.

To start, go back to the Black Seraph Patreon post and download the latest version of the “RG35XX-Garlic-CopyPasteOnTopOfStock.7z” file. Unzip that file with 7Zip, and then move the contents of the “misc” folder into the root directory of the OS partition on the SD1 card (not the partition named ROMS), overwriting all existing files. You may need to delete the old similarly-named files on the partition first before adding the new ones since the partition is so small.

Next, copy the “CFW” folder from the unzipped .7zip file and move it to the ROMs partition of your SD1 card, overwriting all existing files.

If using a single-card setup, you also need to move the contents of the ROMS folder into the ROMS folder of your SD1 card. This will add any new folders to your card so that you can take advantage of any newly-added cores/systems (if using a Mac, choose the “Merge” option so that you don’t overwrite existing folders).

If using a two-card setup, you need to move the contents of the ROMS folder into the ROMS folder of your SD2 card, overwriting all existing files as well. This will add any new folders to your card so that you can take advantage of any newly-added cores/systems (if using a Mac, choose the “Merge” option so that you don’t overwrite existing folders).

Note that this update process will overwrite your RetroArch configuration file, but given that each release comes with new optimized configurations made by the developer, I recommend following the updated config files anyway.

Set the real-time clock (RTC)

GarlicOS now has an ability to set the RTC for games like Pokémon. To do so, press START when in the main menu and a clock adjustment window will pop up. Adjust the date and time to your liking, then press START again to save it. That’s it!

Overclocking (or underclocking) the RG35XX

GarlicOS has a handy option to overclock the system in case you run into a game that has performance issues. Additionally, you could also underclock the system when playing less-demanding games (like Atari 2600, for example), to improve battery life during marathon retro gaming sessions.

When in the main menu, press the SELECT button to toggle the various overclock options. You can quickly see the overclock setting by looking at the battery icon at the top right of the screen:

NO symbol: no overclock
PLUS symbol: slight overclock
PLUS PLUS symbol: moderate overclock
MINUS symbol: slight underclock
MINUS MINUS symbol: moderate underclock

Note that the over/underclock options are implemented system-wide, and not on a per-game basis. If you want to switch to a different game and remove any clocking, you will need to toggle it off.

Changing the GarlicOS skin

There are several skins available for GarlicOS, and the best repository for them is at RG35XX.com. To install, download the theme of your choice, then unzip it and you should find a folder named “skin” inside. On your SD1 card, go to the CFW folder and replace the default “skin” with the one you just downloaded. Note that you could also make a backup of the old “skin” folder in case you want to revert to the stock, or you can download the stock skin again from the link above.

Adding boxart to the menus

It is possible to add boxart to the RG35XX menus in GarlicOS, but the current implementation is a little inelegant. I would consider this part of the guide to be intermediate, since it requires installation of special tools and using command line. But it’s kind of fun, too. Special thanks to Retro Handhelds discord user Waffles for some of the tips below.

Get your boxart. I recommend using Skraper to scrape your boxart directly from your ROM library. If you haven’t used this tool before, here is a quick video guide I made a while back for older systems, but the process will work here as well. Additionally, you can download boxarts individually using Libretro’s thumbnail repository (this will be handy if you have a smaller library). It doesn’t matter what size image you save it as, as because we will adjust the size later in this guide (but keeping it at least 340px wide is recommended for this setup).

Rename your image files. Your image file names need to match the game file exactly (i.e. Super Mario World (US).png for Super Mario World (US).sfc). You can do this by hand, or Skraper will name the image files appropriately for you during the scraping process.

Adjust the image sizes to match GarlicOS. Download and install the latest ImageMagick binary file from their website. We’ll now use command line to bulk-resize the images quickly (one system at a time). I recommend backing up your images somewhere safe in case you mess them up during this stage of the process!

  • Windows: Navigate to a folder that hosts your images (like your SNES images), then hold SHIFT and right-click in that folder, and select “Open PowerShell window here”. A command line will open up, and type the following code (you can just copy and paste it from here):
magick mogrify -resize 340x480 -extent 640x480 -gravity West -background none *

If done correctly, the image will be resized to fit the left side of a 640×480 window. You won’t get an indication that it worked correctly within the command line, you just have to check it yourself once it’s done. Repeat this process for your other game folders.

  • Mac: Open up Terminal, and type the following code (you can just copy and paste it from here):
mogrify -resize 340x480 -extent 640x480 -gravity West -background none *

If done correctly, the image will be resized to fit the left side of a 640×480 window. You won’t get an indication that it worked correctly within the command line, you just have to check it yourself once it’s done. Repeat this process for your other game folders.

Move the images to your GarlicOS SD card. Place your images in the Roms > (name of system) > Imgs folder of whatever card holds your ROM files. If there isn’t an “Imgs” folder already inside your (name of system) folder, you will need to make it first.

Realign the text to match the image. On your SD1 card, navigate to CFW > skin > settings.json and open it with a text editor. Within this file, make these two changes:

"text-alignment": "left",
"text-margin": 352,

And that’s it. Note that any time you update your skin or update GarlicOS you will likely have to go in and change these lines of code again.

There are quite a few steps to get the boxart displaying, but until there is a different solution within GarlicOS, this method will work! Just make sure that you have file names that match the ROM name, that is the most important part.

Additional tips

  • The battery indicator on this device is not accurate, due to some voltage reading issues with the hardware. You should expect about 3-4 hours of battery life altogether, even if the indicator started otherwise.
  • While in a game, tap the MENU button to return to the GarlicOS menu. It will save your progress when you exit the game. If tapping the MENU button doesn’t work, try double-tapping the button, that will usually do the trick.
  • While in a game, tap the POWER button to put the device to sleep. Hold the POWER button for three seconds to awaken the device, it will resume your progress in the game. To power down the device altogether, hold the POWER button for three seconds when in the main GarlicOS menu.
  • To reduce clutter, you can consolidate games into the same folder if they share the same emulator core. For example, you can add Genesis, Sega CD, and 32x games to the “MD” folder and they will al show up under the same folder and launch properly. The same could be done with GB/GBC, PCE/PCECD, CPS/FBNeo, and more.

Here are some hotkeys to remember:

MENU + X = RetroArch quick menu
MENU + R2 = save state
MENU + L2 = load state
MENU + R1 = fast forward (toggle)
MENU + L1 = slow motion
MENU + Volume UP = increase screen brightness
MENU + Volume DOWN = reduce screen brightness

GarlicOS has some neat features under the hood, including custom scaling, and so you really don’t need to do much within RetroArch to adjust the settings. These will likely improve with every new release, too. However, if you’d like to tinker a bit, here are some tips to get you on your way:

  • While in a game, hold the MENU button and press X to enter the RetroArch quick menu. Note that due to the way this version of RetroArch behaves, in order to make permanent changes you will need to open up RA via the RA icon within the main GarlicOS menu.
    • Inside the Core Options section you can make adjustments like removing the sprite limit on certain systems, or setting colorization options for systems like Game Boy and Game Boy Color.
    • Inside Settings > Video > Scaling you can toggle the “Keep Aspect Ratio” setting in case you want to see a different aspect ratio on your game. If you find a setting that works particularly well with the system you are playing, go to Quick Menu > Overrides > Save Content Directory Overrides to apply this setting to all games within that same folder. This works well with the GB, GBC, and GBA systems, since by default GarlicOS scales them to the native 4:3 aspect ratio of the display instead of the original system aspect ratio.

Changelog

31JAN2023
– redesigned the guide to include single-card and dual-card setups
– updated each section to accommodate recent changes to GarlicOS
– added RTC section
– added overclocking section
– added themes/skins section
– added boxart guide

18JAN2023
– fixed typos and reworded the ROMS file structure (thanks to Black Seraph for proofreading)

17JAN2023
– added Boxart section
– updated BIOS location and instructions

15JAN2023
– updated MacOS instructions

10JAN2023
– added minor corrections and note about adding “CFW” folder to SD2

03JAN2022
– published guide

52 thoughts on “Anbernic RG35XX Starter Guide

  1. I appreciate you so much, I’m messing around and trying to customize mine as I got it a few days ago. Seriously, this guide is beyond helpful! Also massive thanks to BlackSeraph and all those who add such massive value to our community

    Like

    1. Also, really valuable tip: adjust your brightness up and down by holding MENU and pressing the Volume Up or Down keys, respectively.

      Like

  2. Thank you for this! Any idea how to get PS1 games to show up only once in the directory? I have the chd and m3u for each game and it’s listing them both so there are 2 titles for each game. Thanks for any help!

    Like

    1. Hi, I would recommend using CHD files for single-disc games and PBP files for multi-disc games. I’m sure there will be a directory fix down the line, but for now that’s the cleanest way to have a nice PS1 menu.

      Like

  3. Russ, thanks for putting this guide together and all you do for the handheld gaming community!

    One thing to note on this guide: The ‘CFW’ directory in the ROMS partition must be kept on SD1 in order for it to work. Subsequently the ‘CFW’ folder does not need to exist on SD2. Therefore only SD1 needs to be removed (and files updated) during future OS upgrades, SD2 does not need to be touched.

    Thanks again!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi, thanks for the feedback! I’ve added a note about not needing to move the CFW folder to SD2, I previously had omitted that note so as to not complicate the process. I do still prefer adding the other ROMS folder items to SD2 while updating, since as new cores get introduced they will have new blank ROM folders added as well.

      Like

  4. In the listed recommended BIOS Files, for playstation you list scph5001.bin – Which should be revised to scph5501.bin to reflect the files used within your video.

    Thanks for putting this all together!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. This is an incredible resource Russ. And Black Seraph is doing great work. Added disksys.rom to bios directory but can’t get normal NES games to run. Ever other emulator and bios runs great. Curious if anyone knows why.

      Like

      1. Hi, disksys.rom is only required to play old Famicom Disk System games like Doki Doki Panic. If the regular NES games aren’t working I would see if they are a file mismatch from what the emulator is expecting. Personally I use .nes files.

        Like

    1. I chose to use two cards in case there is another OS option in the future that uses the same SD2 card structure. That will allows users to switch between the two different OS options by changing out the SD1 card while using the same SD2 card for both. For now, using SD1 card only is just fine, I was thinking more along the lines of future uses.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Hello. I recently bought this HH. Ibjust played roughly 1 hour and it suddenly got stuck just selecting games. I turn it off and its not turning on anymore. Is this a TF card problem? Even when i charge no light is showing. Hope you can help me. Thanks.

    Like

  6. Order a rg35xx after you’re video on YouTube. Got garlic is to run. Had to update it after image creation before it worked. Thx for the great tutorial.

    Problem I have is that here is no NES folder. I created one and added .Nes files but it does not show in garlicos.
    What am I missing?

    Like

    1. finally found the solution. i did not have to create extra folder but put them in the correct folders. FC for nes games en SFC for super nintendo

      Like

  7. Hi. Thank you for this awesome OS.
    Would it be possible to add a “fast scroll” option? Normally when you push the cross down it scrolls down the games list and up for up. Could you add a possibility to scroll “sidewise down” when when the cross is pushed right and “sidewise up” when pushed left?

    Like

  8. Hmmm, might have done something to my new machine.

    Followed the guide, put just DK for Gameboy on it to test. All worked ok, so pushed the power button to shutdown, removed the SD to put some more roms on, and now it wont turn back on. Eeek. Any advice welcome? it’s not showing a charging symbol when plugged in and it was on 60% battery when turned off (for about 30 mins).

    Thanks

    Like

  9. Hi Russ,

    I wasn’t able to resize the ROMS partition using disk utility on my Mac. Wasn’t able to delete it and create a new petition either. I there doesn’t send to be a free patriot manager for Mac.

    Like

  10. @Keith, I had the same issue and gave up in the end, I could not see the handles to resize in the partition menu, assume the same for you?

    For anyone reading my last post, I managed to get it back on by deleting the saves folder on the roms card.

    My new issue is PlayStation games, they just wont run from the main menu. I can load them up through the Retroarch icon, but then they are displaying in correctly when loaded. squished to almost 16:9 ratio. Anyone else have this issue?

    Thanks

    Like

  11. @ TheDekuNut
    Yup. Nothing worked for me. Couldn’t even burn an image of the stock os to a good sd card. Im sending it back.

    Like

  12. This guide is great and I was able to set up Garlic OS on our RG35XX. It’s working great so far for me for NES, GBC, GBA, and MD. However, SNES games keep crashing on me on the latest build (January 13th). Is anyone else having the same issue on SNES games on the latest build? I would love to know how to fix it.

    Like

  13. First time doing this type of thing and it was running great with Garlic OS. I was trying a PS1 game with the bio in the wrong folder and then got stuck in a boot loop. I even re-flashed the SD1 card and it still won’t boot properly but the stock Rg35XX seems to boot when I used the original card it came with. I am don’t know what to do now…

    Like

  14. Thanks for this guide – for some reason after flashing the first SD card, the Roms folder has all of the folders within it, but they are all empty (you mention it having the cores / about 500mb in size). Is this an issue anyone else has run into?

    Like

    1. If you are talking about what I mentioned, I just left it as is with the empty folders, added a test rom to the FC directory (smb3), added some bios files to the bios folder, and everything seems to be working properly. I skipped using the 2nd SD card, as I am happy with everything on the single card based on my needs.

      Like

  15. Has anyone had issues with games freezing? I have SNES and GBA games and they will just freeze and force a restart. Haven’t made it more than 10 minutes without a freeze 😦 Just installed the new version released today too!

    Like

  16. I can’t seem to get the USB support working… I put a file named waitForUSB in the misc folder. Anyone know how to get this feature working?

    Like

  17. Just wanted to give a heads up in case anyone runs into the issue I just had. I ended up having to resize my root partition to be a bit bigger. In order to add today’s update as it was like a 6mb to big for what the partition currently was and will give an error that there is not enough room to copy the new files.

    Like

    1. Same exact issue.

      Here is my comment I just wrote but do you have any fix?

      I tried updating Garlic OS but the misc file was too big to fit in the root directory file. I expanded it but it was still too big. Tried expanding it again and it gives me the error message mentioned. I stopped the whole process but now my anbernic wont get past the GarlicOS screen. I think I just have to start the SD1 card process all over. To do that, should I delete all partitions except the Fat32 partition? Then reflash GarlicOS and let it split it into the 4 partitions?

      Like

      1. In the future, the best thing to do is to first delete the old uImage file from SD1. Then you should be able to copy over the files from the misc folder.

        Like

  18. Hi,

    I just got my device today and it’s great. The one thing I’m trying to figure out is if there is a way to show the games by filename instead of by the game’s database name. When you have different versions of the same game, it can get messy trying to find the right one out of a bunch of identically named games. I found a post about how to do it with retroarch with emulationstation on a pi or pc, but I can’t find any references on whether it is possible to do it on GarlicOS. Anyone?

    Like

  19. hi

    back in december i bought 1 RG35XX but the screen arrived defective i emailed abernic and they send me a replacement 20 days later it arrived but im having trouble removing the screen since i dont have any experience

    any help?

    Like

  20. I tried updating Garlic OS but the misc file was too big to fit in the root directory file. I expanded it but it was still too big. Tried expanding it again and it gives me the error message mentioned. I stopped the whole process but now my anbernic wont get past the GarlicOS screen. I think I just have to start the SD1 card process all over. To do that, should I delete all partitions except the Fat32 partition? Then reflash GarlicOS and let it split it into the 4 partitions?

    Like

    1. Best thing to do is to first delete the uImage file from SD1, then you should be able to copy/overwrite the files from the misc folder from there.

      Like

  21. What do you think, is there any chance that Garlic OS will ever be able to be used with the original pico8 or pico8_dyn packages? (like on amberelec) Not with fake-8 or retro8 cores. My experience is that these cores (fake-8, retro8) never work as good as original.

    Like

  22. Hi i would like to recreate original color scheme for pokemon red like in “my old boy” emulator is there any way around, i don’t want “color emulation”

    Like

  23. Hello great guide! I turned on system after new sd card and now it’s stuck on GarlicOS screen. Any idea as to why it is caught up? Thanks.

    Like

  24. I assume, given the device comes with roms, you can create a GarlicOS SD1, then just copy the roms from the original card to it?
    Do you need to do anything to organise them or just blanket copy?

    Like

    1. Yes, you can move the ROMs from the stock card onto a new card, but beware that many of those games are in Chinese or are a hacked version of the game, so I would recommend sourcing your own game files at some point if you’d like a nicer experience. There is no need to organize them other than to double-check that they are in a file format that GarlicOS accepts (they probably already are).

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s